Posts tagged "dallas"


January 15th, 2013

Dallas Tears Down Ex-Home of JFK Assassin Oswald

thekennedydynasty:

DALLAS (AP) — A handful of history buffs and curious onlookers watched Monday as a bulldozer tore through the walls of a dilapidated apartment building where Lee Harvey Oswald lived a few months before the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

The uninhabited 10-unit, two-story apartment complex built in 1925 was one of several remaining places tied to Kennedy’s Nov. 22, 1963, assassination, which remains perhaps the most infamous moment in Dallas history. Oswald lived at the building at 600 Elsbeth St. with his wife, Marina, and young daughter from November 1962 to March 1963.

The residence is mentioned in the Warren Commission report that investigated Kennedy’s death and concluded Oswald acted alone.

The bulldozer ramming through the walls started with the side where Oswald lived. Police blocked off Elsbeth Street and the sidewalk in front, but let onlookers grab bricks from the side of the building.

Tom Sclar, a local resident and musician, put five bricks in a backpack as souvenirs and possibly sale items later. Sclar said the building was included on tours he once gave to groups interested in the many alternate theories about Kennedy’s death — though he called himself a “borderline agnostic” on the question of who shot Kennedy.

“People sell this crap for money,” Sclar said. “I’m doing it out of a weird, kitschy interest.”

Jose Sorola said he was fascinated by the history of two presidential assassins — Oswald and John Wilkes Booth, who killed Abraham Lincoln. Sorola had heard about the upcoming demolition on the news and eventually purchased an apartment window for $125 online. His goal, he said, was to build a “traveling wall” around the window so it could be displayed to others.

“He still lived here, and in my opinion, he’s a part of Dallas history,” Sorola said. “Maybe for the wrong reason, but he’s still a part of history.”

Kennedy’s assassination still generates plenty of controversy, particularly as theories still circulate about whether Oswald acted alone. The Warren Commission’s report says Oswald shot Kennedy from the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository building — now a museum dedicated to Kennedy and the assassination. The Warren Commission also concluded that Oswald killed Dallas police officer J.D. Tippit 45 minutes after Kennedy was shot.

Gary Mack, curator of the Sixth Floor Museum, said Oswald ordered the revolver that killed Tippit in January 1963, when Oswald was living at the Elsbeth Street apartment. But, he added, “The most important parts of the Oswald story are what he did, not where he did them.

“One has to draw the line somewhere at what is or is not historically significant. For those studying Oswald’s life, this may be a more important address, but for those who are curious about the Kennedy assassination, what actually happened in Dealey Plaza is of far more significance,” Mack said.

Jane Bryant bought the apartment building in 2007, later saying she hadn’t known at the time about its link to history. But she was never able to realize plans to renovate it. In 2008 she got caught up in litigation with the city over the state of the building.

The city got a court order last May to have it razed and took over demolition when Bryant failed to act quickly enough.

Bryant told The Associated Press late Monday that she has spent “close to $100,000 in legal fees trying to save a historic property and trying to do everything the city asked me to do.” But she said the city “made it impossible for me to renovate.”

The city estimated demolition and asbestos abatement would run about $52,000 and said it may put a lien on the property to recover its costs.

January 12th, 2013

jackandjackie:

RFK’s Children speak about President Kennedy’s Assassination in Dallas ~ Jan 11th, 2013

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is convinced that a lone gunman wasn’t solely responsible for the assassination of his uncle, President John F. Kennedy, and said his father believed the Warren Commission report was a “shoddy piece of craftsmanship.”

Kennedy and his sister, Rory, spoke about their family Friday night while being interviewed in front of an audience by Charlie Rose at the Winspear Opera House in Dallas. The event comes as a year of observances begins for the 50th anniversary of the president’s death.

Their uncle was killed on Nov. 22, 1963, while riding in a motorcade through Dallas. Five years later, their father was assassinated in a Los Angeles Hotel while celebrating his win in the California Democratic presidential primary.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. said his father spent a year trying to come to grips with his brother’s death, reading the work of Greek philosophers, Catholic scholars, Henry David Thoreau, poets and others “trying to figure out kind of the existential implications of why a just God would allow injustice to happen of the magnitude he was seeing.”

He said his father thought the Warren Commission, which concluded Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in killing the president, was a “shoddy piece of craftsmanship.” He said that he, too, questioned the report.

“The evidence at this point I think is very, very convincing that it was not a lone gunman,” he said, but he didn’t say what he believed may have happened.

Rose asked if he believed his father, the U.S. attorney general at the time of his brother’s death, felt “some sense of guilt because he thought there might have been a link between his very aggressive efforts against organized crime.”

Kennedy replied: “I think that’s true. He talked about that. He publicly supported the Warren Commission report but privately he was dismissive of it.”

He said his father had investigators do research into the assassination and found that phone records of Oswald and nightclub owner Jack Ruby, who killed Oswald two days after the president’s assassination, “were like an inventory” of mafia leaders the government had been investigating.

He said his father, later elected U.S. senator in New York, was “fairly convinced” that others were involved.

The attorney and well-known environmentalist also told the audience light-hearted stories Friday about memories of his uncle. As a young child with an interest in the environment, he said, he made an appointment with his uncle to speak with him in the Oval Office about pollution.

He’d even caught a salamander to present to the president, which unfortunately died before the meeting.

“He kept saying to me, ‘It doesn’t look well,’” he recalled.

Rory Kennedy, a documentary filmmaker whose recent film “Ethel” looks at the life of her mother, also focused on the happier memories. She said she and her siblings grew up in a culture where it was important to give back.

“In all of the tragedy and challenge, when you try to make sense of it and understand it, it’s very difficult to fully make sense of it,” she said. “But I do feel that in everything that I’ve experienced that has been difficult and that has been hard and that has been loss, that I’ve gained something in it.”

“We were kind of lucky because we lost our members of our family when they were involved in a great endeavor,” her brother added. “And that endeavor is to make this country live up to her ideals.”

inothernews:

 WIND-WHIPPED   A large tornado looms over Lancaster, Texas near Interstate 20 Tuesday afternoon. Heavy damage was reported in Lancaster, Arlington and elsewhere after storms spawned multiple tornadoes across the area.  (Photo: Parrish Velasco via the Dallas Morning News)
April 3rd, 2012

inothernews:

WIND-WHIPPED   A large tornado looms over Lancaster, Texas near Interstate 20 Tuesday afternoon. Heavy damage was reported in Lancaster, Arlington and elsewhere after storms spawned multiple tornadoes across the area.  (Photo: Parrish Velasco via the Dallas Morning News)

(via randomactsofchaos)