Posts tagged "titanic"


April 15th, 2012

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): RMS Titanic (1912)

At 11:40 p.m. (ship’s time) on April 14, 1912 the Titanic scraped its hull against an iceberg. By 2:20 a.m. on April 15, the stern disappeared from view. When it was all said and done 1,513 passengers and crew lost their lives. (There were 2,224 aboard the ship, which means a survival rate of less than 32%.)

Obit of the Day will not go into the details regarding the tragic events of April 14-15, 1912 but I do recommend the following stories about the most famous ship disaster in history:

Why Women and Children Were Saved on the Titanic, but Not on the Lusitania (Daily Mail)

Experts Split on Possibility of Remains at Titanic Site (NY Times)

Titanic’s Sinking: Was It More Than Human Folly? (Huffington Post)

Remembering the Titanic’s Intrepid Bandleader (NPR)

History Lost and Found: A Letter From Titanic (NPR)

Arrival of Titanic Survivors in NYC Sets Off Free-For-All (WNYC)

The images above are various front pages from newspapers in the United States, and one from the United Kingdom, announcing the sinking of the Titanic and its tremendous loss of life. All images copyright of the paper listed, unless noted.

Top Left: New York Times, April 16, 1912; courtesy of KTAR.com

Top Right: The Daily Oklahoman, April 16, 1912; courtesy of newsok.com

Center Left: Owensboro (KY) Daily Messenger (now the Messenger-Inquirer), April 17, 1912; courtesy of commercialappeal.com

Center: Franklin Repository (Chambersburg, PA), April 16, 1912; courtesy of publicopiniononline.com

Center Right: Chicago Daily Tribune, April 16, 1912; courtesy of CORBIS.com

Bottom Left: Houston Chronicle and Herald, April 16, 1912; courtesy of chron.com

Bottom Right: Daily Mirror (London, England), April 16, 1912; courtesy of cliff1066™’s Flickr account

(via thedailyfeed)

April 15th, 2012

Titanic Survivors: A Breakdown by Class

shortformblog:

thepoliticalnotebook:

  • First Class Passengers: 63% survived (200 out of 319 lived).
  • Second Class Passengers: 43% survived (117 out of 269 lived).
  • Third Class Passengers: 25% survived (172 out of 699 lived).

Any death, regardless of class, is a horrible and tragic thing, but on the anniversary of the Titanic’s sinking it’s important to remember one of the things that night symbolizes: that, even in moments of terrible crisis and great collective peril, we remain divided and valued by the ticket we can afford. 

[Data via John Henderson of Ithaca College]

A great lesson told through numbers.

life:

The last wireless message sent by Titanic’s radio operator, Jack Phillips, advising that the ship is “sinking fast” and passengers are being put into lifeboats.
See more photos from the book,Titanic: The Tragedy that Shook the World: One Century Later here.
(Father Browne/Universal Images Group/Getty Images)
April 15th, 2012

life:

The last wireless message sent by Titanic’s radio operator, Jack Phillips, advising that the ship is “sinking fast” and passengers are being put into lifeboats.

See more photos from the book,Titanic: The Tragedy that Shook the World: One Century Later here.

(Father Browne/Universal Images Group/Getty Images)

kateoplis:

Two of Titanic’s engines lie exposed in a gaping cross section of the stern. Draped in “rusticles”—orange stalactites created by iron-eating bacteria—these massive structures, four stories tall, once powered the largest moving man-made object on Earth.
March 22nd, 2012

kateoplis:

Two of Titanic’s engines lie exposed in a gaping cross section of the stern. Draped in “rusticles”—orange stalactites created by iron-eating bacteria—these massive structures, four stories tall, once powered the largest moving man-made object on Earth.

March 7th, 2012

Okay, okay… I have seen and heard a number of people making fun of this movie and the rerelease.  Y’all were still in the theatres in the weeks following it’s release on December 19th, 1997, because even if I did pay to see it in the theatres seven times, I was not the only one comprising the box office receives in the hundreds of millions domestically alone.  (James Cameron and I share a birthday, if you must know… ;o) )

I’m pretty much ignoring the people making silly comments.  I love this movie, but don’t often watch it.  It came out a year to the day before my wedding, and I had wanted to walk down the aisle to “The Portrait” which is the piano part of the theme playing when James Cameron/Leonardo DiCaprio/Jack Dawson is drawing Kate Winslet/Rose DeWitt-Bukater in her room.  Even if I won the battle with my mom to actually do it, I didn’t get to, thanks to a musical mishap, but I guess that was just one more sign… 

Maybe I just feel a strange circle happening in my life right now, and not in a bad way.  Titanic came out when I was at my happiest and most hopeful.  At the end of the day, it’s about returning to the one you love, in addition to a historical drama.  I loved the costumes and the hats, and even Billy Zane’s portrayal of Cal. 

Am I going to see it in the theatres?  Probably.  But, I’m betting I won’t be the only one.