Posts tagged "union"


September 6th, 2013

valerieharpers:

I’m not perfect. I made mistakes. But if you go in the mill, I want life to be better for you than it is for me. That’s why I joined up with the union, and that’s why I got fired for it. You understand me? Now you know what I am. And you know that I believe in standing up for what I think is right.

Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979)

(via lipstick-feminists)

September 4th, 2013

When political candidates in New York City appeal to unionized workers, they are reaching out for the most part to minorities and women, according to a study released on Tuesday. White men account for less than one-fourth of the city’s union members, according to the study, written by Ruth Milkman, a sociology professor at the CUNY Graduate Center, and a colleague, Stephanie Luce. Fully 60 percent of all union members in the city identify themselves as either black or Latino; women who do not identify themselves as black or Latino make up an additional 17 percent of the city’s union members. “We all carry around in our heads this stereotype of a union member as a white male hard hat,” said Ms. Milkman, who tracks trends in labor. She said she was “shocked” that white males were only 23 percent of the membership. The decline of white male union membership has many causes, including the near-wipeout of manufacturing in the city and the sharp decline in unionization in the private sector, labor experts say. Meanwhile, the fastest-growing sectors of the economy have included health care and education, female-dominated industries that have attracted large numbers of minorities.

New York City’s Unionized Workers Are Mostly Minorities, a Study Shows - NYTimes.com (via dendroica)

(via dendroica)

July 16th, 2013

Professional Procrastination Confession

I’m supposed to be writing up a blog post for my Boss’s blog (I’ll post the link here when I’m done) about the last month, the two special sessions, the history I witnessed personally. 

She wants the piece to be short, where brevity is preferred and my usual details are left as concise as possible.  

…And, I can’t even think of how to begin.  

How do you wrap the past month in one, single, solitary blog post?  I lied to myself over the weekend, telling myself that once the bill was passed it would be easier, but it’s not.  It’s actually a lot harder. 

I want the focus on this piece to be about watching a group of people come together: the power I witnessed, because, this is for a Union President’s professional blog, but everything… all of it… 

I want it to be a call to arms, and I believe I’m capable of that and, now that I’m writing about it and starting to focus a bit, it’s becoming a bit easier to get the phrasing in my head.  

I’m a somewhat gifted writer… but one blog piece on a transition this important?  

I’m not sure I’m THAT good…

June 5th, 2013

99picketlines:

Restaurant workers at DISHES, an upscale midtown Manhattan deli, are standing up against wage theft and for safety and respect in the workplace.

99 Pickets and the Occupy Wall Street community are mobilizing in support of these courageous workers.

“Line clogging” is a fun, easy way to pressure a restaurant owner to negotiate with his employees.
http://99pickets.org/dishes

More info about what’s happening at DISHES:
http://wagingnonviolence.org/feature/what-does-it-take-to-organize-a-workplace/

April 29th, 2013

thenationmagazine:

Thousands of labor and environmental activists gathered in downtown St. Louis today to protest corporate greed at Peabody Energy’s annual shareholders meeting, in solidarity with the United Mine Workers union. For more check out the Twitter hashtag #UMWA. (Photos from @CathySherwin and @aliemalie)

This makes me so proud of our Union Brothers and Sisters in St. Louis!

.@repalgreen, @rweingarten, and @hcaflcio’s secretary-treasurer, Richard Shaw listen to community leaders and organizers talk about the issues surrounding #immigration reform #labor #union
March 22nd, 2013

.@repalgreen, @rweingarten, and @hcaflcio’s secretary-treasurer, Richard Shaw listen to community leaders and organizers talk about the issues surrounding #immigration reform #labor #union

March 2nd, 2013

NWHM, March 2nd and 3rd: Sally Field and Crystal Lee Sutton

On the weekends during NWHM, I tend to post maybe more controversial figures to the list of women.  Controversial because they’re more artist: actor, singer, the like, than academic, which is where many writers can be categorized.  I still try to focus on women who have truly made a difference, in some way, shape, or form, though.  

My Dad has a huge crush on Sally Field.  No lie.  He will watch any movie she’s in.   I doubt he’d leave my Mom for her, even if she would leave him for Bruce Springsteen, but still, Sally Field is his celebrity crush. 

I don’t know if that came about before or after the film Norma Rae.  You see, my Dad was a Building Steward for CWA when he worked for Southwestern Bell.  He was one of the better ones, vocal in his organizing.  I’m not sure if my Mom as a member of the union before they met, but I’d be willing to bet so, so I grew up as a union kid, and I know very well what they’ve done for me and for the middle class of this country.  

I think that’s why I try to dedicate my time to the union efforts, why I’m drawn to them.  Though, this post is not about me, this is about Sally Field and Crystal Lee Sutton.  

Sally Field has created some of the best loved characters on both the small screen and in movie roles.  From Gidget to Norma Rae to M’Lynn, she has lit up the screen and made us laugh, cry, and root for a “Bandit”.

Yet, she still champions women’s health and women’s rights, including using her “pulpit” during her 2007 Emmy win to state, “If the mothers ruled the world, there would be no wars in the first place!” even though the U.S. audience watching at home didn’t see the entire quote.  (It was censored, but played around the world.)  

Most notably, Sally Field works to gain awareness of osteoporosis, and considering that my mother’s own form of arthritis is as yet, technically unclassified, but relates most commonly to osteoarthritis, I am grateful.  Many women do not understand how much osteoporosis can affect them as they age, nor are there people that champion the far less sexy health risks that are especially dangerous for women, like heart problems (which kill more women than breast cancer) or things like osteoporosis.  

Additionally, Sally Field uses her time to fight on behalf of the LGBT community for Equal Rights.  

Yet, when she played Norma Rae, she did so in a field that was largely unionized in an environment where unions were largely more accepted.  

It was Crystal Lee Sutton, not Sally Field (or Norma Rae) that should get the kudos for standing on a work bench, after writing “UNION” on a piece of cardboard and waiting for each and every machine and worker to stop and look at her.  This act immortalized on film by Sally, was completely true, and Sutton paid dearly for it, by also being arrested and then, being fired for her attempts to unionize the J.P. Stevens textile factory she worked at under the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union.  

(I can’t find the entire scene anywhere that I can embed it.  But here’s a link to it, and everyone should watch the powerfulness of the ENTIRE scene.)

Until you work for a union, you have no idea how much strength it takes for an employee to not just stand up and say, “I can’t take it anymore, I quit”, but to go further and say, “I can’t take it anymore, this is completely unfair and we need to work to change the system.”  it’s incredibly rare, especially when you’re going against the grain.  It’s rare to watch or see people willing to sacrifice their own comfort, their own home life to make a difference, not just for themselves, but for their fellow workers.  

Crystal Lee Sutton deserves to be remembered, for doing just that.  

image

(Shameless plug and request for recommendations for women to feature.)

elizabethwarrenma:

Happy Labor Day!

This woman… I love how she communicates with people… She puts it in their language, not expecting them to become policy wonks.  This is a fundamental problem with the Democratic Party today and if she can help reverse some of that thinking in the party?  She deserves a medal.  
September 4th, 2012

elizabethwarrenma:

Happy Labor Day!

This woman… I love how she communicates with people… She puts it in their language, not expecting them to become policy wonks.  This is a fundamental problem with the Democratic Party today and if she can help reverse some of that thinking in the party?  She deserves a medal.